Friday Fascination

Sinister Spring

Don’t you just love Spring—the scent of mowed grass and rain-soaked streets, birds waking you up way before the alarm clock, the excitement of new life and possibilities, the flower-power kaleidoscope of color?  But don’t forget the ominous side of blooms on display.  You think that daffodil is harmless?  Or the daisy an innocent blossom created to merely admire?  Superstition says otherwise.  Let’s take a look at a few of the more sinister weeds of glorious Spring.

photo courtesy of freedigitalphotos.net/Keattikorn
photo courtesy of freedigitalphotos.net/Keattikorn

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Snowdrops – those pristine, early bloomers marking Spring’s arrival have a bad reputation.  They love to infest graveyards.  Not too surprising superstition advises never to bring a snowdrop into your house.  Unless you like dead things.  Some think they have the power to addle eggs too.  So think twice about picking a wild snowdrop, especially from a cemetery.  But you wouldn’t be wandering around gravestones picking flowers anyway, would you?

 

photo courtesy of freedigitalphotos.net/Dan
photo courtesy of freedigitalphotos.net/Dan

 

 

 

 

 

 

The magical daisy.  Never mind the “he loves me, he loves me not” superstition.  I can tell you for real that particular ceremony doesn’t work.  At all.  But if you want to know if you’re going to die from a disease, grind it up with wine.  Or hey, if you’re looking for a reason to drink, try it out.  Drink it.  If you vomit, you’re a goner.  Dream of daisies during fall or winter, bad luck’s coming your way.  Predict how many years of freedom you have left by picking a handful of daisies with your eyes closed.  Count the blossoms and that’s how long you have before getting the ol’ ball and chain.  And if you want a preview of your future tormenter-by-marriage, put daisy roots under your pillow.  You’ll dream of him (but sometimes ignorance is truly bliss).

photo courtesy of freedigitalphotos.net/Graeme Weatherston
photo courtesy of freedigitalphotos.net/Graeme Weatherston

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ah, the colorful crocus. Its rumored to be an aphrodisiac and the legend of its origin sexy.  Zeus and Hera made mad, passionate love on a bank, so intense the bank beneath theme exploded into crocuses.  Hot, huh?  But every part of the crocus is toxic (for those of you looking to get rid of your deadbeat boyfriend) and plucking one is bad luck.

photo courtesy of freedigitalphotos.net/franky242
photo courtesy of freedigitalphotos.net/franky242

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sure, daffodils look bright and cheery.  They light up a hillside like sprinkles of sunlight.  They kill chickens.  Yep, that’s right.  Daffodils are the enemy of the Easter bunny.  Bring a single daffodil indoors, then only one chick will hatch from a clutch of eggs.  But 13 daffodils inside is okay (lucky number, I guess).  And whatever you do, don’t watch a daffodil wilt.  Bad ju-ju there.  But if your BFF gets together with your ex and invites you to their wedding, be sure to go.  With a bunch of daffodils as a special gift.  They’ll never know what hit them.

What’s your favorite spring flower?  Do you know it’s dark secrets?  Or have you fallen victim to its facade of innocence?

5 Comments

    1. coleenjb says:

      This is all your fault, Rhenna!

  1. Highspeed says:

    Hmmmmmmmmmmmm, The sinister flower of Oregon otherwise known as the Wild Wood Flower actually has magical powers according to some. Even though I have never tried such, I have investigated, arrested and seen many who possess a card to possess such a flower. From medieval days to Woodstock, hence these flowers have flourished. I rest my case:)

    1. coleenjb says:

      I’ll have to check into the mysteries of the “wild wood flower”…although I heard tale of a tea-drinking herbalist in Albany who is very familiar with this plant. Care to defend yourself, Twila M?

  2. Cynthia says:

    Hmmmmmm, good to know!!! Forget voodoo dolls it’s all about the flowers. Muhahhahaha!!!

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